Role models

role model

noun

a person whose behavior, example, or success is or can be emulated by others, especially by younger people

Who is your role model?  According to Dictionary.com a role model is: “a person whose behavior, example or success is or can be emulated by others, especially by younger people. “  Ones view of “role model” is unique based on characteristics that describe themselves such as, their age, hobbies, background, culture, class and job. Some examples may include:

Kids

  • TV show character: Clifford the big red dog or Spongebob an imaginary sea creature
  • Singer: Jason Aldean (country singer) or Nelly (rapper)
  • Basketball Player: Michael Jordan

High School Students:

  • College or professional sports player
  • Movie stars who make a lot of money
  • Popular girl/boy who has a lot of friends or cool clothes

College:

  • Professors helping them reach their degree
  • Parents who support their students dreams and pay for the tuition
  • Successful business man: Bill Gates

Although it would take years to write out all the possible role models, the above categories cover the basics.  I think it is easily seen that adults are more realistic with their role models than children.  For example when you are young there is not much meaning behind who you want your footsteps to follow, but once your older you start to think realistically about who you want your life to model. 

Once you finish college your role model will potentially be someone you look up to in your career.  As we have been taught the past couple weeks in J2150 lecture, there are many different emphasizes you can choose with a journalism major.  Including:

            Broadcast

            Photojournalism

            Strategic Communication

            Convergence

With each of these emphasizes there are many different career choices and therefore lots of “role models”.  Some famous role models who studied journalism and communication in college include: 

Spike Lee

 

Meg Ryan

Denzel Washington

Hugh Hefner

Sarah Palin

Katie Couric

The list above clearly illustrates the wide variety of career’s that have been taken with a Journalism and communications degree.  This unique variety show’s that you don’t just have to write or report the rest of your life if you choose this major.  I think it also show’s that after you finish your emphasis there is a lot jobs you can have that most do not realize. This could even include becoming as well known as some of Journalist role models listed above, assuming you have the drive and work ethics to push your self there.  To read more about famous journalists check out the below websites:

http://journalismdegree.org/2009/25-most-influential-journalists-in-history/

http://www.0701h.com/?p=380

http://shsphotojournalism.zxq.net/Photojournalists.html

http://www.steveseager.com/

So despite all the stress and pressure that has been put into the past couple weeks of   lecture regarding choosing our emphasis, I think it is important to step back and realize we have a lot to look forward too.  Although, we will not all become as famous as some of the role models mentioned above we should still step back and take the opportunity to learn seriously.  Yes, it has and will be stressful deciding what direction to take with our major, but in the long run we have a lot a going for us.  No matter what emphasis you choose there will be many different career paths and with hard work you can strive to be anything you want to be.  Even if that means being a “role model” to the people you work with at your future job, or just a good example to the citizens your severing. 

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s